Bad Blogger

heathicorn:

apparently some guy named mark was trying to tell my mom he needed to speak with my dad about any financial transactions my mom was making because he was the man of the house and she did not take kindly to his implying that my dad was the primary breadwinner/person in charge in our family so

image

(via themicrobiologist)

Permalink | 122,641 notes | August 21, 2014

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

Follow our Tumblr - Like us on Facebook

(via scienceyoucanlove)

Permalink | 19,932 notes | August 21, 2014

iwishihadafather:

YEEEEEEESSS

(Source: africa-by-toto, via nuffnufftoys)

Permalink | 117,784 notes | August 18, 2014
diacrit:

hanesonly:

I almost forgot my briefcase!

it contains important lab results

diacrit:

hanesonly:

I almost forgot my briefcase!

it contains important lab results

(Source: awwww-cute, via tastefullyoffensive)

Permalink | 269,409 notes | August 18, 2014
blamoscience:


Etsy user aliciawatkins creates tiny embroideries of germs and microbes. She has both completed projects and DIY kits for you to stitch your own, so if you’re a nerdy crafter like I am I suggest you give her shop a look!

blamoscience:

Etsy user aliciawatkins creates tiny embroideries of germs and microbes. She has both completed projects and DIY kits for you to stitch your own, so if you’re a nerdy crafter like I am I suggest you give her shop a look!

(via scishow)

Permalink | 1,186 notes | August 17, 2014

jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

As if we needed another reason to appreciate how amazing bees are: Artist and beekeeper Ren Ri makes breathtaking sculptures using plastic, salvaged wood, and a swarm of bees.

Well, to be fair, the bees did half the work :)

(Source: explore-blog, via scishow)

Permalink | 2,029 notes | August 17, 2014

artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

(via scishow)

Permalink | 4,936 notes | August 17, 2014

(Source: ogallure, via nuffnufftoys)

Permalink | 498,144 notes | August 17, 2014
tastefullyoffensive:

[@vernetroyer]

tastefullyoffensive:

[@vernetroyer]

Permalink | 10,277 notes | August 14, 2014
Reblog if you think gay marriage should be legal.

sammywillk:

troylerina:

cccuunnnt:

the-legend-of-hetalia:

awindowtothewest:

the-queen-of-anchors:

HOLY FUCK THE NOTES.

image

HOLY SHIT LOOK AT THE NOTES

reblog EVERY TIME THIS IS ON YOUR DASH .

If you follow me and you don’t reblog this, we’re gonna have a little issue.

I will 500% judge you if you don’t Reblog

THE NOTES

can this break the notes already

(Source: inthemidstofmonsters, via belonephilic)

Permalink | 12,631,821 notes | August 12, 2014

wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.

We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.

(Dead Poets Society, 1989)

(via ohcatrina)

Permalink | 470,483 notes | August 12, 2014
visiblemonster:

could they have picked a creepier name for this color.

visiblemonster:

could they have picked a creepier name for this color.

(Source: visiblemonster-archive, via greyusurper)

Permalink | 210,671 notes | August 10, 2014
bpod-mrc:

08 August 2014
Slipping Into Cells
Nanoparticles could potentially be used to deliver drugs, genes, and biosensors into target cells. But how can these tiny cargo carriers be made to slip easily into cell membranes without damaging them? Now, scientists have found that tailor-made gold nanoparticles can do it in much the same way as vesicles, tiny floating pouches that naturally fuse with cell membranes to deliver neurotransmitters or hormones. The trick is to coat synthetic particles with a particular mix of molecules that cling to certain parts of the membrane, allowing the tiny spheres to be absorbed without causing any disruption. Pictured is a computer-generated simulation of one of these particles (top) fusing with a layer of cell membrane (bottom). Experiments in the Petri dish confirmed the model’s predictions. In the end, cells where vesicle-style fusion occurs naturally, such as nerve cells in the brain, might be the best targets for these membrane-crossing drug parcels.
Written by Daniel Cossins
—
Image by Reid Van LehnMassachusetts Institute of Technology, USAOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)Research published in Nature Communications, July 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

08 August 2014

Slipping Into Cells

Nanoparticles could potentially be used to deliver drugs, genes, and biosensors into target cells. But how can these tiny cargo carriers be made to slip easily into cell membranes without damaging them? Now, scientists have found that tailor-made gold nanoparticles can do it in much the same way as vesicles, tiny floating pouches that naturally fuse with cell membranes to deliver neurotransmitters or hormones. The trick is to coat synthetic particles with a particular mix of molecules that cling to certain parts of the membrane, allowing the tiny spheres to be absorbed without causing any disruption. Pictured is a computer-generated simulation of one of these particles (top) fusing with a layer of cell membrane (bottom). Experiments in the Petri dish confirmed the model’s predictions. In the end, cells where vesicle-style fusion occurs naturally, such as nerve cells in the brain, might be the best targets for these membrane-crossing drug parcels.

Written by Daniel Cossins

Image by Reid Van Lehn
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
Research published in Nature Communications, July 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

Permalink | 41 notes | August 8, 2014
biomedicalephemera:

Public and Military Health Posters for Contagious and Infectious Disease
In everyday speech, and even in many news reports, the terms “contagious" and "infectious" are often used interchangeably. In epidemiology (the study of how diseases spread) and most other scientific fields, however, they have distinct definitions. All contagious diseases are infectious, but not all infectious diseases are contagious.
Infectious diseases:
Are caused by “infective agents” - that is, bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or prions - which are non-self organisms.
Cause clinically evident disease.
Not caused by immune dysfunction, non-infected injury, or psychological conditions.
Not caused by bodily reactions to chemicals or poisons not secreted by infective agents.
Transmitted in many, many ways, but generally originate outside of the infected host. An exception is in immune-compromised patients who become infected by commensal organisms.
Contagious diseases:
Are infectious diseases transmitted from person-to-person, with no special agent or vector required.
Can be spread via airborne droplets, other bodily secretions, or fomites (any object or substance capable of carrying infectious organisms, such as clothing, money, doorknobs, or stethoscopes).
Are the cause of most epidemics (a notable exception is the Black Plague, which probably was caught through flea vectors).
Spread can be controlled by quarantine and isolation.
Another context in which “infectious” and “contagious” are used is to describe something as highly infectious or highly contagious. 
Highly infectious:
Symptomatic disease can be caused by a very low number of infectious agents being introduced into the body.
Some highly infectious agents (such as ebola), can be caused by a very low number of pathogens, but can only cause infection when introduced into the body in a specific manner - for example, ebola does not cause infection when inhaled, but a tiny droplet of infected bodily secretion landing on an open wound can cause disease.
Highly contagious: 
Generally refers to the ability of the pathogen to survive outside of the host, and the number of ways it can be transmitted.
Can be spread through airborne droplets.
To use the ebola example, even though it can’t be caught through airborne droplets, it can be caught through fomites, dead bodies, sexual intercourse, and contact with almost any bodily fluids. Because it’s not airborne, however, it’s considered highly infectious but not highly contagious, at least by virologists.
However, for practical use, because it is so infectious, and has many other modes of transmission, it’s often called “highly contagious” in the media.
Posters from National Archive of Medical History’s Otis Archives

biomedicalephemera:

Public and Military Health Posters for Contagious and Infectious Disease

In everyday speech, and even in many news reports, the terms “contagious" and "infectious" are often used interchangeably. In epidemiology (the study of how diseases spread) and most other scientific fields, however, they have distinct definitions. All contagious diseases are infectious, but not all infectious diseases are contagious.

Infectious diseases:

  • Are caused by “infective agents” - that is, bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or prions - which are non-self organisms.
  • Cause clinically evident disease.
  • Not caused by immune dysfunction, non-infected injury, or psychological conditions.
  • Not caused by bodily reactions to chemicals or poisons not secreted by infective agents.
  • Transmitted in many, many ways, but generally originate outside of the infected host. An exception is in immune-compromised patients who become infected by commensal organisms.

Contagious diseases:

  • Are infectious diseases transmitted from person-to-person, with no special agent or vector required.
  • Can be spread via airborne droplets, other bodily secretions, or fomites (any object or substance capable of carrying infectious organisms, such as clothing, money, doorknobs, or stethoscopes).
  • Are the cause of most epidemics (a notable exception is the Black Plague, which probably was caught through flea vectors).
  • Spread can be controlled by quarantine and isolation.

Another context in which “infectious” and “contagious” are used is to describe something as highly infectious or highly contagious. 

Highly infectious:

  • Symptomatic disease can be caused by a very low number of infectious agents being introduced into the body.
  • Some highly infectious agents (such as ebola), can be caused by a very low number of pathogens, but can only cause infection when introduced into the body in a specific manner - for example, ebola does not cause infection when inhaled, but a tiny droplet of infected bodily secretion landing on an open wound can cause disease.

Highly contagious:

  • Generally refers to the ability of the pathogen to survive outside of the host, and the number of ways it can be transmitted.
  • Can be spread through airborne droplets.

To use the ebola example, even though it can’t be caught through airborne droplets, it can be caught through fomites, dead bodies, sexual intercourse, and contact with almost any bodily fluids. Because it’s not airborne, however, it’s considered highly infectious but not highly contagious, at least by virologists.

However, for practical use, because it is so infectious, and has many other modes of transmission, it’s often called “highly contagious” in the media.

Posters from National Archive of Medical History’s Otis Archives

(via biomedicalephemera)

Permalink | 584 notes | August 8, 2014
georgetakei:

Baby shower cake makes a spemanent impression.
And there’s more funny pictures where this one came from… http://po.st/SpermCakeGT

georgetakei:

Baby shower cake makes a spemanent impression.

And there’s more funny pictures where this one came from… http://po.st/SpermCakeGT

Permalink | 711 notes | August 8, 2014